Archive for January, 2008

Gay Utopia Symposium Now Online

The Gay Utopia symposium that I’ve been working on for the last several months is now online here. Here’s some more info: The Gay Utopia is an online symposium devoted to exploring that ideal realm in which gender, sexuality, and identity dissolve. It includes poetry, artwork, comics, personal essays, reviews, fiction, drama, slash, and more […]

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Ariel Schrag: Somewhat Forgotten, But Not Gone

In the mid-90s, I moved to Chicago, and for the first time in my life had access to comic stores that carried an extensive range of indie titles. Some of these comics were interesting, some mediocre, some frankly bad. But there were two creators who dazzled me. Chris Ware was one. The other was a […]

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Fetish of Media Empire

I have a review of Michael Manning and Patrick Conlon’s Tranceptor Series online over at the Reader now: Extra bonus: Puritans run amok in the comments section! For those who want more Manning, his website is here. Manning has actually contributed a pretty terrific essay about Aubrey Beardsley to the Gay Utopia symposium I’m putting […]

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Fletcher Hanks

For a moment I forgot the title of this Fletcher Hanks book, and was convinced it was actually All your base are belong to us. That’s not right, of course — the real title of the book is I Shall Destroy All Civilized Planets! But the slip up isn’t exactly an accident either. He’s a […]

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Nana #7-#8

I’ve reviewed various volumes of Ai Yazawa’s Nana before, so I thought I’d keep it up. (There are going to be spoilers, incidentally — be warned.) I just read #7-8, and they seem to be something of a watershed for the series. The series has always followed on both Nana’s (Nana Komatsu, or Hachi, and […]

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Identity Art

The queer fantasy romance of Edie Fake’s Gaylord Phoenix

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Accepting Porn As Your Personal Savior

This is a work of pornography — not erotica — which also presents itself as a work of art. The graphical style is gorgeous and distinctive, the characters have individual personalities, and their relationships are respectfully and realistically explored in a way designed to appeal to women as well as men. The sex is violent, […]

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