Archive for: architecture

Magicians and Architects

Sean disputes originality and craft with his grandmother.

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Strange Windows: A Master at the Dawn

When a new art form appears, how often does it spawn a master craftsman at or near the beginning of its existence? Surprisingly often.

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Reading Drawings: Architecture and Comics

I will look at how we read both architectural drawings and comics, based on my own understanding of how each works.

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Strange Windows: Draw Buildings, Build Drawings (part 3)

In the two previous parts of this essay, we surveyed the intersection of comics and architecture in a one-sided way: showing how comics draw on architecture. But what do comics have to offer architecture in return? In conjunction with the Archi et BD exhibition reviewed in part 1, several architects were asked about their relationship […]

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Strange Windows: Draw Buildings, Build Drawings (part 2)

What are the links between comics and architecture? At first thought, not many, other than the banal facts that cartoonists draw a lot of buildings, and that a few modern buildings look like something whacky or sci-fi-like that could’ve come from a comic book. I believe there are deeper connections. A strip cartoonist ‘builds’ a […]

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Too Much is Never Enough: Morris Lapidus’ Postmodern Curves

HU’s been preoccupied with architecture this week. In yesterday’s post, Suat noted that “the building shorn of its façade has long been favored by cartoonists in search of a structure which best encapsulates the comics reading experience in a physically possible form: the rooms and walls acting like panels and borders…” But it’s worth noting […]

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Review: Josh Simmons’ House

In an interview given in conjunction with Archi et BD, la Ville Dessinée (see Alex Buchet’s post), Jean-Marc Thévenet suggests there is in many comics “a psychological pressure suffered by a hero who is more often than not dominated by the environment in which they live.”  This is, perhaps, the most common manifestation of architecture […]

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