Archive for: Moto Hagio

Voices From the Archive: Jason Thompson on Orientalism

The limits of pointing out Orientalism in art.

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Heart of Thomas, Heart of Tedium

The case against Moto Hagio’s Heart of Thomas.

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Forests and Trees

For Ken Parille, the story is about punishing adults. Whether or not that’s the case, there’s not doubt that “Bianca” is more effective at punishing Bianca than it is at punishing Clara. Clara grows up and becomes a successful artist. Bianca suffers death by landscape.

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Moto Hagio: Girls and Artists

It took me a little while, but thanks to Melinda Beasi I finally caught up with a long review at Manga Curmudgeon by HU columnist Erica Friedman discussing A Drunken Dream. It’s in many ways a response (either intentionally or otherwise) to my series of posts on the book, and particularly to my discussion of […]

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Criticizing the Critics: Moto Hagio’s A Drunken Dream

Over the last couple of months, I’ve written five lengthy posts about A Drunken Dream Fantagraphics’ collection of stories by the great shojo manga-ka Moto Hagio. I’ve spent so much time on this book for a number of reasons. Hagio is a central figure in the history of shojo, a genre in which I’m interested. […]

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Moto Hagio: Who Watches the Watchwoman?

This is I think my penultimate post about the Moto Hagio’s collection of stories A Drunken Dream. You can read the whole series here. _________________ Drunken Dream concludes with two entirely forgettable sentimental ghost stories: “The Child Who Comes Home” and “The Willow Tree.” Both exploit familial grief — respectively, dead child and dead mother […]

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Moto Hagio: “Iguana Girl”

I’m blogging my way through Fantagraphics’ Moto Hagio collection, “A Drunken Dream.” You can read the whole series of posts here. _________________________________ In reviews of Drunken Dream, “Iguana Girl” is generally pointed out as the highlight of the collection along with Hanshin: Half-God. The two stories are similar in a lot of ways; both involve […]

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