Archive for: Muck Encrusted Mockery of a Roundtable

The Grammar Lesson

Alan Moore, Jesus Christ, and collaboration.

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Muck-Encrusted Comments

The Swamp Thing roundtable has shambled along a bit longer than I expected, and we’re still not necessarily done. But while we’re waiting for a last post I thought I’d pull some passing thought-bubbles from the muck: Andrei Molotiu: if issue 20 is damage control, it’s excellent damage control, taking a narrative that had rolled […]

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Muck-Encrusted Mockery of a Phallus

In his post, Eric argued that Moore’s Swamp Thing is feminist, both because it presents Abby as a strong, heroic figure and because it critiques Swamp Thing’s own abusive use of patriarchal power. I agree with Eric that power and gender are both important themes in the Swamp Thing series. I’m less certain that Moore […]

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Muck-Encrusted Mockery of a Roundtable: Liberty, Fecundity, Perversity

Swamp Thing is the uber-incarnation of “wallowing in familiar tropes.”

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Muck Encrusted Mockery of a Roundtable: Yellow and Blue Make Green, a light first read

Unlike many readers here, I haven’t read much Moore.  I started with Voodoo, which I  hated utterly, tried something else, and never went back. I was looking forward to Swamp Thing, because so many people recommended it and thought I would enjoy it.  And I’m sorry to say that I think, well, I think I […]

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Muck Encrusted…: Power, Gender, Jeans: An Ode To Abby Cable

As any reader of Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing can tell you, there’s little doubt that the emotional core of the series is Abigail Arcane Cable, initially Swampy’s friend, later his paramour, and still later, his common-law wife. Moore’s greatest coup in the series was in turning Abby into what is probably the greatest female character […]

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Muck Encrusted Mockery of a Roundtable: False Starts

Once upon a time, there was a character called Swamp Thing. He was created by Len Wein and Berni[e] Wrightson in 1971, and then there were some other comics, and then The Anatomy Lesson happened and everyone started paying attention, or at least retroactively turned their attention to that point in time, since not a […]

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