Archive for January, 2011

Made For You and Me: Localizing Disney’s Imperialism for an Egyptian Audience

  I would be hard pressed to pick a better mascot for the United States as an imperial hegemon than Mickey Mouse. In Egypt — as with most of the “developing world” — Mr. Mouse is ubiquitous: you can see his big round eyes staring at you on the side of taxi cabs, through the glass […]

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Wut 4

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Utilitarian Review 1/29/11

On HU Domingos Isabelinho does a close read of a page of Herge. In comments he explains what he did wrong. Stephanie Folse looks at issues 3 and 4 of Elfquest. Matthias Wivel looks at Jimmy Corrigan in light of Chris Ware’s later work. Richard Cook looks back at the Comics Code. Ng Suat Tong […]

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Strange Windows: Keeping up with the Goonses (Index)

Lexicographer: a writer of dictionaries, a harmless drudge, that busies himself in tracing the original, and detailing the signification of words. – Samuel Johnson, Dictionary (1751) In a seven-part series, we  surveyed the contributions of comics and cartoons to  English popular language Part 1, part 2, part 3 looked at American newspaper comic strips; part […]

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Strange Windows:Keeping Up with the Goonses (part 7)

This is part seven of our look at comics, cartoons and language– today focussing on Britain Art by Heath Robinson Britain has a long, rich tradition of cartooning second to no other land’s. And, as we saw for American English, cartoons have contributed to the country’s popular language.

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The World Panelled

I recently finished Stanley Cavell’s 1971 book of film philosophy, “The World Viewed” (with a long addendum from 1979.) The book is a mixed bag. Many of Cavell’s readings are thoughtful and sharp. On the other hand his take on one film I know well, “Rosemary’s Baby,” is so misguided as to be actually offensive. […]

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Review: Brecht Evens’ The Wrong Place

The revelers which fill the stairwell of Brecht Evens’ cover painting seem like a code for the contents of his book, ever striving for the space which occupies the right topmost corner of that image. They are dressed as for a masque: a conga line of harlequins, butterflies, angels, fairies, gauchos, ballerinas and Greek gods; ancient […]

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