Komikusu

Komikusu, Selling Awesome Manga: Belated Conclusion

I was originally not going to write a conclusion for last week’s Komikusu discussion. But then I was chatting to Tucker Stone, and he mentioned that he’d enjoyed reading the roundtable. This took me a little aback, because Tucker’s come out fairly strongly in the past against the “we must read more lit comics!” meme […]

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Thinking Outside the Comic-Shop: Exposing Great Manga to Grown-Ups

Can Manga Muster Up Its Maus / Watchmen Mega-Crossover Hit?

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Selling Awesome Manga

As other people on this roundtable have pointed out, we’ve been using “arty manga” as a catchall term for a variety of niche manga with potential appeal to older readers: genuine alternative and underground manga (gekiga, the work of Junko Mizuno), offbeat manga similar in content to American indie comics (Viz’s SigIkki line, pretty much […]

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Ed Chavez on Arty Manga, Past and Future

The essay below is by Ed Chavez of Vertical Press. ____________________ 30 years ago all translated manga were practically arty comics. The designs were nothing like what was available in the West. The stories were told with a focus on characters, instead of narrative. And while the very first manga in English, Barefoot Gen, came […]

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Indie is as indie does

It seems to me that the two defining characteristics of indie manga are:
Who licensed and published it in English and the content of the manga itself.

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Peggy Burns on D&Q’s Success With Gekiga

Peggy Burns, Associate Publisher at Drawn & Quarterly, was not able to participate in this roundtable…but she did graciously agree to let me reproduce an edited version of the email she sent me when she declined. It’s below. Hi Noah, Thank you for the invitation but I do not think I would have much to […]

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Three not-so-radical ideas for marketing manga to grown-ups

One of the things that struck me when reading Erica and Brigid’s contributions to the roundtable was that each proposed solutions that made sense for a particular audience. In Erica’s case, that audience is comprised of adult manga fans who have a passionate engagement with the medium, a knowledge of its history, and an active […]

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