Archive for: dyspeptic ouroboros

Dyspeptic Ouroboros: Gary Groth and Victorian Dresses

A week or so back, I posted a response to a post by Jeet Heer which prompted a strenuous objection from Gary Groth. In the course of responding to Gary, I said this: I was replying to the structure of [Jeet’s] argument and to his examples, not to his actual argument per se. There seemed […]

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Dyspeptic Ouroboros: First Thing We Do, Let’s Burn All the Interviews

Jeet Heer has a post up about Why We Need Criticism. His basic premise, as near as I can tell, is that criticism is just people talking about art — so whether or not we “need” criticism, we’re unlikely to get away from it. I don’t have any problem with that per se, but…well, look […]

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DWYCK: Hergé and the Order of Things

We’ve had a fair amount of discussion about how to approach comics critically here at HU lately, and I figured I’d expand a little upon some of the points I’ve made previously regarding cartooning as a visual phenomenon. From a modernist critical perspective, it seems clear that comics’ artistic achievement through their modern history — […]

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Dyspeptic Ouroboros: Walter Benjamin Lite

“The gift of judgment is rarer than the gift of creativity.” Oskar Loerke as quoted by Walter Benjamin. In the tradition of appreciative stealing, this post will consist of a series of quotes by Walter Benjamin, one of the main ports of call for people seeking a voice of authority on art, literature, children’s books, […]

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Dyspeptic Ouroboros: Tom Spurgeon on Criticism

Tom Spurgeon of The Comics Reporter was kind enough to agree to an interview about criticism and art. We communicated by email. ______________________________ Noah: Your site seems to work to promote a sense of comics as a community —pointing out events and birthdays and doing collective memory projects like the one involving Frank Frazetta. So […]

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Dyspeptic Ouroborus: What am I doing? What are you doing?

Me and you, we’re critics. Let’s talk about that.

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Dyspeptic Ouroboros: Alyssa Rosenberg on Pop Culture and Criticism

Popular culture, is a place where both creators and consumers work out real-life issues ranging from deciding whether to have sex before marriage to what would happen in a world with extremely large, well-equipped private armies.

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